How Not to Get Arrested

#Literature

Sun, Nov 10th, 2013 21:00 by capnasty NEWS

On The Atlantic Cities, Mike Riggs looks at a book titled Arrest-Proof Yourself by Dale Carson, a defense attorney in Jacksonville, Florida and also "an alumnus of the Miami-Dade Police Department and the FBI." The condensed tips on making yourself arrest proof are actually great, and particularly this part would explain why I'm constantly getting pulled over while driving my rumbling 25-year-old low-rider:

"In 21st century America," he writes, "as long as you're not committing a crime, you should be able to wear the wildest clothes you want, roam the streets when you feel like it, and lean on a light post or hang out at some wild club if it amuses you." "Should" is the key word. In reality, cops love hassling people who stand out, even though it's not illegal to, say, have a Buckeyes bumper sticker that looks like a pot leaf. If you drive a sports car or a lowrider, you're more likely to attract a cop's attention than if you drive, say, a gray Honda Civic. Same goes for clothes, hairstyles, tone and volume of voice. Be boring.

So try to blend in. Beat cops who patrol the same routes day after day are "incredibly attuned to incongruity." But don't be too reactive when you see cops. "Police are visual predators," Carson writes. "Any sudden change in motion, speed, direction or behavior immediately attracts their attention." That means even if you're doing something you think might attract a cop's attention, quickly doing something else will attract even more attention. "Don't alter the pattern," Carson advises. "Keep on keeping on."

Also, if you can help it, don't go out after dark.

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